Francis Bacon aka William Shakespeare used the word “blow” 221 times. You can either read every line, or scroll down to see what that looks like on a flyer.

  1. Would blow me to an ague, when I thought. – Merchant of Venice: I, i
  2. Ring the alarum-bell! blow, wind! come, wrack! – Macbeth: V, v
  3. blow like sweet roses in this summer air… – Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  4. Them; they all run away; and falstaff, after a blow… – King Henry IV, part I: II, ii
  5. Are angels vailing clouds, or roses blown…. – Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  6. Your blows…. – The Comedy of Errors: IV, iv
  7. With his surcease success; that but this blow… – Macbeth: I, vii
  8. Will blow these sands, like sibyl’s leaves, abroad… – Titus Andronicus: IV, i
  9. When blows have made me stay, I fled from words. – Coriolanus: II, ii
  10. What time the shepherd, blowing of his nails… – King Henry VI, part III: II, v
  11. What a blow was there given! – The Tempest: II, i
  12. To such exsufflicate and blown surmises… – Othello: III, iii
  13. To change blows with thee for our day of doom. – King Richard II: III, ii
  14. This shower, blown up by tempest of the soul… – King John: V, ii
  15. That which his noble ancestors achieved with blows… – King Richard II: II, i
  16. That shall demonstrate these quick blows of fortune’s… – Timon of Athens: I, i
  17. That quicken even with blowing. o thou weed… – Othello: IV, ii
  18. Tears then for babes; blows and revenge for me… – King Henry VI, part III: II, i
  19. Of every wind that blows… – The Winter’s Tale: IV, iv
  20. My unblown flowers, new-appearing sweets! – King Richard III: IV, iv
  21. My heart will be blown up by the root. – Toilus and Cressida: IV, iv
  22. Must feel war’s blow, who spares not innocence: – Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, ii
  23. If the skin were parchment, and the blows you gave… – The Comedy of Errors: III, i
  24. I wait the sharpest blow, antiochus. – Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
  25. I know a bank where the wild thyme blows… – A Midsummer Night’s Dream: II, i
  26. I cleft his beaver with a downright blow… – King Henry VI, part III: I, i
  27. How now, blown jack! how now, quilt… – King Henry IV, part I: IV, ii
  28. For the four winds blow in from every coast… – Merchant of Venice: I, i
  29. For flattery is the bellows blows up sin… – Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, ii
  30. For every storm that blows: i, to bear this… – Timon of Athens: IV, iii
  31. But when the blast of war blows in our ears, King Henry V: III, i
  32. Bids the winds blow the earth into the sea, King Lear: III, i
  33. As zephyrs blowing below the violet, Cymbeline: IV, ii
  34. And with the half-blown rose. but fortune, o, King John: III, i
  35. And the very ports they blow, Macbeth: I, iii
  36. A good note; that keeps you from the blow of the law. Twelfth Night: III, iv
  37. You seem to be? can you think to blow out the Coriolanus: V, ii
  38. Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all: The Taming of the Shrew: II, i
  39. Would blow you through and through. The Winter’s Tale: IV, iv
  40. Words before blows: is it so, countrymen? Julius Caesar: V, i
  41. With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as may; Hamlet: III, iii
  42. With titles blown from adulation? King Henry V: IV, i
  43. Will blow them down. Antony and Cleopatra: II, vii
  44. Will blow it to pieces, they are so pitifully sodden. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, ii
  45. Why, now, blow wind, swell billow and swim bark! Julius Caesar: V, i
  46. Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world Macbeth: III, i
  47. While we were interchanging thrusts and blows, Romeo and Juliet: I, i
  48. Which, when it bites and blows upon my body, As You Like It: II, i
  49. Which sixteen winters cannot blow away, The Winter’s Tale: V, iii
  50. When it hath blown his ranks into the air, Othello: III, iv
  51. When caesar and your brother were at blows, Antony and Cleopatra: II, vi
  52. When all aloud the wind doth blow Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  53. What though the mast be now blown overboard, King Henry VI, part III: V, iv
  54. What storm is this that blows so contrary? Romeo and Juliet: III, ii
  55. We scorn her most when most she offers blows. Antony and Cleopatra: III, xi
  56. Was ever feather so lightly blown to and fro as this King Henry VI, part II: IV, viii
  57. Virgins might blow up men? All’s Well that Ends Well: I, i
  58. Virginity being blown down, man will quicklier be All’s Well that Ends Well: I, i
  59. Undermine you and blow you up. All’s Well that Ends Well: I, i
  60. Under the blow of thralled discontent, Sonnets: CXXIV
  61. Tut, when struck’st thou one blow in the field? King Henry VI, part II: IV, vii
  62. Turn our blown sails; eftsoons i’ll tell thee why. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
  63. To help our fielded friends! come, blow thy blast. Coriolanus: I, iv
  64. To banish him that struck more blows for rome Coriolanus: IV, ii
  65. To smile at scapes and perils overblown. The Taming of the Shrew: V, ii
  66. To blow on whom I please; for so fools have; As You Like It: II, vii
  67. Till fields and blows and groans applaud our sport! King Henry IV, part I: I, iii
  68. Through the sharp hawthorn blows the cold wind. King Lear: III, iv
  69. Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down; Macbeth: IV, i
  70. Thou hast a sigh to blow away this praise, King Henry IV, part II: I, i
  71. Thou dost so crown with gold! this blows my heart: Antony and Cleopatra: IV, vi
  72. Thou art sensible in nothing but blows, and so is an The Comedy of Errors: IV, iv
  73. Thou blow’st for hector. Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
  74. This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourselves; Romeo and Juliet: I, iv
  75. This ague fit of fear is over-blown; King Richard II: III, ii
  76. There is my purse to cure that blow of thine. King Richard III: IV, iv
  77. There is a vent of blood and something blown: Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
  78. Thee, I have been blown out of your gates with Coriolanus: V, ii
  79. Thee with a downright blow! King Henry VI, part II: II, iii
  80. The breath of heaven has blown his spirit out King John: IV, i
  81. The wretch that thou hast blown unto the worst King Lear: IV, i
  82. The posture of your blows are yet unknown; Julius Caesar: V, i
  83. The other’s peace: till then, blows, blood and death! King John: II, i
  84. The flesh-fly blow my mouth. hear my soul speak: The Tempest: III, i
  85. The blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it’s Toilus and Cressida: I, ii
  86. That, in the dole of blows, your son might drop: King Henry IV, part II: I, i
  87. That won you without blows! despising, Coriolanus: III, iii
  88. That will take pains to blow a horn before her? King John: I, i
  89. That were to blow at fire in hope to quench it; Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, iv
  90. That shake not, though they blow perpetually. The Taming of the Shrew: II, i
  91. That I have blown this coal: I do deny it: King Henry VIII: II, iv
  92. That he did buffet thee, and, in his blows, The Comedy of Errors: II, ii
  93. That hath to this maturity blown up Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
  94. That gives not half so great a blow to hear The Taming of the Shrew: I, ii
  95. That unmatch’d form and feature of blown youth Hamlet: III, i
  96. That breath fame blows; that praise, sole sure, Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
  97. That bear’st a cheek for blows, a head for wrongs; King Lear: IV, ii
  98. Sweet blowse, you are a beauteous blossom, sure. Titus Andronicus: IV, ii
  99. Still through the hawthorn blows the cold wind: King Lear: III, iv
  100. Something; make it a word and a blow. Romeo and Juliet: III, i
  101. So, come, help: well struck! there was blow for blow. The Comedy of Errors: III, i
  102. So many blows upon this face of mine, King Richard II: IV, i
  103. So great, hortensio, but we may blow our nails The Taming of the Shrew: I, i
  104. Sighing and grief! it blows a man up like a King Henry IV, part I: II, iv
  105. Show’d mastership in floating; fortune’s blows, Coriolanus: IV, i
  106. Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, Macbeth: I, vii
  107. Shall blow ten thousand souls to heaven or hell; King Henry VI, part II: III, i
  108. Shall blow each dust, each straw, each little rub, King John: III, iv
  109. Seeming to feel this blow, with flaming top Hamlet: II, ii
  110. Our chimneys were blown down; and, as they say, Macbeth: II, iii
  111. Or else this blow should broach thy dearest blood. King Henry VI, part I: III, iv
  112. Or breed upon our absence; that may blow The Winter’s Tale: I, ii
  113. Only for bearing burdens, and sore blows Coriolanus: II, i
  114. Obeying with my wind when I do blow, King Henry VI, part III: III, i
  115. O my poor kingdom, sick with civil blows! King Henry IV, part II: IV, v
  116. Now, lords, my choler being over-blown King Henry VI, part II: I, iii
  117. Now let the general trumpet blow his blast, King Henry VI, part II: V, ii
  118. Not the ill wind which blows no man to good. sweet King Henry IV, part II: V, iii
  119. Not drowned. is the storm overblown? I hid me The Tempest: II, ii
  120. No blown ambition doth our arms incite, King Lear: IV, iv
  121. Ne’er through an arch so hurried the blown tide, Coriolanus: V, iv
  122. My bones: I shall not fear fly-blowing. The Tempest: V, i
  123. More noble blows than ever thou wise words; Coriolanus: IV, ii
  124. Mistress page at the door, sweating and blowing Merry Wives of Windsor: III, iii
  125. May the winds blow till they have waken’d death! Othello: II, i
  126. Master’s whistle. blow, till thou burst thy wind, The Tempest: I, i
  127. Look, as I blow this feather from my face, King Henry VI, part III: III, i
  128. It ish give over: I would have blowed up the town, so King Henry V: III, ii
  129. Is to behold him with flies blown to death. but what The Winter’s Tale: IV, iv
  130. Is this wind westerly that blows? Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, i
  131. Is eaten by the canker ere it blow, The Two Gentlemen of Verona: I, i
  132. Imagination blows him. Twelfth Night: II, v
  133. Ill blows the wind that profits nobody. King Henry VI, part III: II, v
  134. If speaking, why, a vane blown with all winds; Much Ado About Nothing: III, i
  135. I, with blowing the fire, shall warm myself; for, The Taming of the Shrew: IV, i
  136. I will not answer thee with words, but blows. King Henry VI, part I: I, iii
  137. I had rather chop this hand off at a blow, King Henry VI, part III: V, i
  138. I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows The Tempest: III, ii
  139. I am the sea; hark, how her sighs do blow! Titus Andronicus: III, i
  140. I am a feather for each wind that blows: The Winter’s Tale: II, iii
  141. How blow? how blow? speak to be understood. Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  142. His blows are well disposed: there, ajax! Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
  143. Have blown this coal betwixt my lord and me; King Henry VIII: II, iv
  144. Have blown me full of maggot ostentation: Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  145. Hath blown that vice in me: I must repent. King Henry V: III, vi
  146. Hands for my service but blows. when I am cold, The Comedy of Errors: IV, iv
  147. Had rather have it a head: an you use these blows The Comedy of Errors: II, ii
  148. From the dead blow of it. and you, enchantment.– The Winter’s Tale: IV, iv
  149. For now the wind begins to blow; Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, iv
  150. For I have bought it with an hundred blows. King Henry VI, part III: II, v
  151. For strokes received, and many blows repaid, King Henry VI, part III: II, iii
  152. For raging wind blows up incessant showers, King Henry VI, part III: I, iv
  153. Fight closer, or, good faith, you’ll catch a blow. King Henry VI, part III: III, ii
  154. Fight a blow. o lord, my heart! King Henry VI, part II: I, iii
  155. Drop on you both! a south-west blow on ye The Tempest: I, ii
  156. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.Romeo and Juliet: I, i
  157. Do you but strike the blow. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, ii
  158. Come, leave your drinking, and fall to blows. King Henry VI, part II: II, iii
  159. Cold lips blow to their deities, take thee from me. Toilus and Cressida: IV, iv
  160. Clean over-blown, themselves, the conquerors. King Richard III: II, iv
  161. By the wrongs I suffer and the blows I bear. The Comedy of Errors: III, i
  162. By words or blows here let us win our right. King Henry VI, part III: I, i
  163. But far beyond my depth: my high-blown pride King Henry VIII: III, ii
  164. But buckle with thee blows, twice two for one. King Henry VI, part III: I, iv
  165. But blow them to their trial, the bubbles are out. Hamlet: V, ii
  166. blows you to padua here from old verona? The Taming of the Shrew: I, ii
  167. blows in your face. I fear your disposition: King Lear: IV, ii
  168. blows fair from land: they stay for nought at all The Comedy of Errors: IV, i
  169. blows dust in other’s eyes, to spread itself; Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
  170. blown with the windy tempest of my heart, King Henry VI, part III: II, v
  171. blown up: marry, in blowing him down again, with All’s Well that Ends Well: I, i
  172. blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow! King Lear: III, ii
  173. blow, villain, till thy sphered bias cheek Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
  174. blow, blow, thou winter wind. As You Like It: II, vii
  175. blow, and split thyself. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, i
  176. blow me into abhorring! rather make Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
  177. blow me about in winds! roast me in sulphur! Othello: V, ii
  178. blow us. there was a haberdasher’s wife of small King Henry VIII: V, iv
  179. blow off thy cap; praise his most vicious strain, Timon of Athens: IV, iii
  180. Blood hath bought blood and blows have answered blows; King John: II, i
  181. Beat loud the tabourines, let the trumpets blow, Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
  182. Be calm, good wind, blow not a word away The Two Gentlemen of Verona: I, ii
  183. At blow and thrust; even as again they were Othello: II, iii
  184. As thoughts do blow them, higher and higher. Merry Wives of Windsor: V, v
  185. As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown; Much Ado About Nothing: IV, i
  186. And yielding to another when it blows, King Henry VI, part III: III, i
  187. And the loud trumpet blowing them together, King Henry IV, part II: IV, i
  188. And our vain blows malicious mockery. Hamlet: I, i
  189. And now ’tis far too huge to be blown out King John: V, ii
  190. And most desire should meet the blow of justice; Measure for Measure: II, ii
  191. And make thy fortunes proud: the blow thou hadst Antony and Cleopatra: II, v
  192. And let thy blows, doubly redoubled, King Richard II: I, iii
  193. And does not toby take you a blow o’ the lips then? Twelfth Night: II, v
  194. And dick the shepherd blows his nail Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  195. And blow them at the moon: o, ’tis most sweet, Hamlet: III, iv
  196. And blow it to the source from whence it came: King Henry VI, part III: V, iii
  197. And bid them blow towards england’s blessed shore, King Henry VI, part II: III, ii
  198. And as the air blows it to me again, King Henry VI, part III: III, i
  199. And sheathe for lack of sport: let us but blow on them, King Henry V: IV, ii
  200. And leap for joy, though they are lame with blows: Love’s Labour’s Lost: V, ii
  201. And interchanging blows I quickly shed King Henry VI, part I: IV, vi
  202. And blown with restless violence round about Measure for Measure: III, i
  203. An if the wind blow any way from shore, The Comedy of Errors: III, ii
  204. All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven. Othello: III, iii
  205. Air, quoth he, thy cheeks may blow; Love’s Labour’s Lost: IV, iii
  206. Against the blown rose may they stop their nose Antony and Cleopatra: III, xiii
  207. Above five hours: see how she gins to blow Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, ii
  208. A most poor man, made tame to fortune’s blows; King Lear: IV, vi
  209. ’tis well blown, lads: Antony and Cleopatra: IV, iv
  210. ’tis but a blow, which never shall be known. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, i
  211. Trumpet, blow loud, Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
  212. Stinking and fly-blown lies here at our feet. King Henry VI, part I: IV, vii
  213. Sighs of octavia blow the fire up in caesar; and, as Antony and Cleopatra: II, vi
  214. Prest for this blow. the unborn event Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, iv
  215. Plucks off my beard, and blows it in my face? Hamlet: II, ii
  216. O’erblows the filthy and contagious clouds King Henry V: III, iii
  217. Least, he fought with; what wards, what blows, what King Henry IV, part I: I, ii
  218. Fire: and his lips blows at his nose, and it is like King Henry V: III, vi
  219. blows; and withal so doubtfully that I could scarce The Comedy of Errors: II, i
  220. blowers up! is there no military policy, how All’s Well that Ends Well: I, i
  221. ‘air,’ quoth he, ‘thy cheeks may blow; Various poetry: XVII 221.

Blow the Flyer was designed for Dennie Passion and presented at the Petcha Kutcha night in Dubai, UAE.

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